Petrichoreo

This blog has moved to petrichoreo.tumblr.com!  (It’s actually the same URL, but the new one is a primary blog rather than sub-blog, so I will be able to follow others!) If you’re interested in: magazines/journalism  media art/design  technology  - feel free to follow the new Petrichoreo! Thank you :)  

May 3
Hi Followers!
I was flipping through a glossy today and was just captivated by the scent it’s emitting. Naturally, I thought it came from a perfume ad and was even interested in getting that perfume - it smelled so good. 
The source of the scent comes from the ad seen above. But it wasn’t an ad for a perfume. The scent was promoting the Showtime hit The Borgias. Imagine how disappointed I was in the absence of purchasing info. 
In any case, this is a clever new marketing technique, and here, The New York Times advertising columnist Stuart Elliot explains more. 

The goal of the ad inserts, to promote the return of “The Borgias” on April 8 to women ages 25 to 49, was “to elevate ‘The Borgias’ beyond the expected consume drama, giving it modern relevance in a sexy and relatable way,” Nicole Elice, a spokeswoman at Showtime in New York, part of the CBS Corporation, writes in an e-mail.
At the same time, the teaser ads were intended to “connect back to the show,” she says, through the use of “key art” from the series, which appears on the backs of the inserts. That art depicts the woman from the photos — Lucrezia Borgia, played by Holliday Grainger — holding the perfume bottle, posed along with other members of the cast like Jeremy Irons.
The inserts were designed to mimic fragrance ads down to the use of “Lucrezia” as if it were the name of a perfume instead of a character. And in place of the words “Open here to experience (fragrance name)” that typically appear on the scent strips, the ads read “Experience at your own risk,” echoing the murderous reputation of Lucrezia Borgia.
The scent was developed for the ads, Ms. Elice says, by the Visionaire Group, and selected by an internal team at Showtime to perfume the inserts. The scent was chosen because it “evokes femininity,” she adds, and “female empowerment.”
The ad inserts appeared in magazines like Entertainment Weekly, The New York Times Magazine, People and Vanity Fair. And in another “meta” moment, there were display ads “showcasing the Lucrezia scent strip creative” running on Web sites that included The Huffington Post, imdb.com, The Los Angeles Times, and nymag.com.
[source]
May 3

I was flipping through a glossy today and was just captivated by the scent it’s emitting. Naturally, I thought it came from a perfume ad and was even interested in getting that perfume - it smelled so good. 

The source of the scent comes from the ad seen above. But it wasn’t an ad for a perfume. The scent was promoting the Showtime hit The Borgias. Imagine how disappointed I was in the absence of purchasing info. 

In any case, this is a clever new marketing technique, and here, The New York Times advertising columnist Stuart Elliot explains more. 

The goal of the ad inserts, to promote the return of “The Borgias” on April 8 to women ages 25 to 49, was “to elevate ‘The Borgias’ beyond the expected consume drama, giving it modern relevance in a sexy and relatable way,” Nicole Elice, a spokeswoman at Showtime in New York, part of the CBS Corporation, writes in an e-mail.

At the same time, the teaser ads were intended to “connect back to the show,” she says, through the use of “key art” from the series, which appears on the backs of the inserts. That art depicts the woman from the photos — Lucrezia Borgia, played by Holliday Grainger — holding the perfume bottle, posed along with other members of the cast like Jeremy Irons.

The inserts were designed to mimic fragrance ads down to the use of “Lucrezia” as if it were the name of a perfume instead of a character. And in place of the words “Open here to experience (fragrance name)” that typically appear on the scent strips, the ads read “Experience at your own risk,” echoing the murderous reputation of Lucrezia Borgia.

The scent was developed for the ads, Ms. Elice says, by the Visionaire Group, and selected by an internal team at Showtime to perfume the inserts. The scent was chosen because it “evokes femininity,” she adds, and “female empowerment.”

The ad inserts appeared in magazines like Entertainment Weekly, The New York Times Magazine, People and Vanity Fair. And in another “meta” moment, there were display ads “showcasing the Lucrezia scent strip creative” running on Web sites that included The Huffington Post, imdb.com, The Los Angeles Times, and nymag.com.

[source]

In fact, anyone looking for comedy should just nest at home, because Hollywood comedy has become a plague, a blight, and an affront to humanity. The gross-out element in film comedy (puke, poop, sperm, breast milk - any bodily fluid with projectile possibilities) has gotten so prevalent and predictable that it’s as if filmmakers had their heads diapered.  James Wolcott, Vanity Fair May 2012. 

Apr 21
Prime Time’s Graduation: Television has officially surpassed the movies

"Television ‘is a medium of entertainment which permits millions of people to listen to the same joke at the same time, and yet remain lonesome.’"

-

TS Eliot 

This little quote on the cover of the May Vanity Fair caught me by surprise. Although it’s suggesting that TV makes us quite lonely, the quote immediately reminded me of what we’re losing with the anytime-anywhere digital TV uprising. Maybe it’s the right direction and maybe it’s the inevitable direction. But it’s weird that future generations will have no idea what “prime time” means because the prime time for the new How I Met Your Mother , Game of Thrones or whatever you prefer might be on a Saturday morning, while folding laundry. 

Technology is enabling self-centricity and pressuring us to multi-task and fit in everything perfectly. Isn’t there value in giving up something else to watch your show live, with the rest of the audience nationwide? 

Sentimentally yes. But it might already be obsolete.  

Apr 20
Twitter Cover Concept for The New Yorker [x]
Twitter and spring-green? I would’ve picked up that issue in a heartbeat. 
Apr 18

Twitter Cover Concept for The New Yorker [x]

Twitter and spring-green? I would’ve picked up that issue in a heartbeat. 


Mags on mags on mags… @ Studio 
Apr 6

Mags on mags on mags… @ Studio 

hello88goodbye:

First issue of Fast Company came today! Even though it’s March, I’m already in love with the matte finish! (Taken with instagram)

Reblogging myself :) 
Apr 4

hello88goodbye:

First issue of Fast Company came today! Even though it’s March, I’m already in love with the matte finish! (Taken with instagram)

Reblogging myself :) 

kdkathryn knows how to treat a friend right! 
Apr 1

kdkathryn knows how to treat a friend right! 

(Source: hello88goodbye)

To be honest, I’m NEVER going to be able to read them all. And even though a lot of content is available online, I will always have that special attraction to print magazines.  It’s unfathomable how most magazines (depending on different subscription deals) cost something like 10-cents to 85-cents an issue. But I feel like they’re worth so much more. And somehow, the slight cost doesn’t seem to reflect all the work put into producing them. Then again, printing is now an ancient technology. At least I can afford to catch ‘em all. 

Apr 1
I recently subscribed to Fast Company and WIRED.
Throwback ll Vanity Fair February 1921 
Mar 18

Throwback ll Vanity Fair February 1921 

(Source: pudsalicious)